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Rock-Star Sound Quality for iPods, MP3 Players

December 14, 2010 By Home Entertainment Editorial Staff



Do you notice those in-ear monitors that musicians wear onstage? Known for exceptional noise isolation (-26dB), comfort and superior sound quality, your favorite Rock Gods rely on brands like JH Audio to let them hear everything that the band is pumping out. Now you can have your very own custom pair of Pro Series in-ear monitors for your iPod or other mobile music delivery system.
 
Used by the likes of Aerosmith, Guns ‘N Roses, Lady Gaga, Linkin Park, Alicia Keys, Barry Manilow and many other professional musicians, the JHAudio PRO series incorporate many audio drivers and a integrated three-way crossover in a small, comfortable device. The resulting sound quality and noise isolation properties enable music lovers to experience every last drop of sound from their favorite tunes, without the risk of hearing damage from high-volume listening. Said JHAudio founder and audio pioneer Jerry Harvey. "Listening to music through the Pro Series is like sitting right there in the studio mix down room with the sound engineer. They're custom fit to stay put and built to withstand the head-banging, over-the-top, soaked-with-sweat on-stage performances of professional performers."
 

Customers who order the devices visit a professional audiologist who takes an impression of their ear canal. The mold is then sent to JHAudio, which designs the shell piece to precisely match the mold for a truly custom fit.

 

Models range from $799 MSRP to the flagship JH 16 Pro, with eight drivers, for $1,149 MSRP. 
 
For more information about the JHAudio PRO series, visit:

 

 

 
 JH Audio's Pro 16 Series In-Ear monitors

 

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